War and society

War and society

It builds on a long foundation of teaching and researching the history of war and society since the university was founded in the s. To understand how war works, a broad range of methods must be brought into play. Historians of technology examine not only shifts in weaponry, from the spear to the drone, but also other transformations in material culture canned food and communication methods the telegraph, social media. Sussex students benefit from extensive archival resources onsite, such as the refugee papers collected by the German-Jewish Centre. For a Full Year credit module, this will equate to 40 hours of teaching time 2 hours per week with hours of self study. The centre is based in the Department of History , but is interdisciplinary in its vision and practice. The aim of the sociological aspect of the module is to describe and explain the main changes in the relationships between warfare, armed forces and society that have occurred since the 'military revolution' in Western Europe during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.

We work closely with other centres in the department and university with whom our interests overlap, such as the Centre for German-Jewish Studies and the Centre for Resistance Studies. It builds on a long foundation of teaching and researching the history of war and society since the university was founded in the s.

Social historians might study the everyday experiences of rank-and-file soldiers, or consider how life changed for the families whom soldiers left behind. LEARNING OUTCOMES The aim of the more philosophical topics in the module is to provide students with an understanding of: The key challenges to moral thinking about war and how these can be met by the development of a robust framework for the ethical evaluation of war; An appreciation of the role of just war thinking in the critical examination of war and of the importance of the virtues in military life; Through selected case studies, how to analyse and evaluate critically the morality of past, present and prospective military conflicts.

war and society pdf

At undergraduate level, students can study modules throughout their degree programme which consider the direct and indirect effects of war and violence on society in a variety of global, comparative and national contexts.

The changing character of war and its implications for how we think about war and society in the twenty-first century. Our work ranges in time from the American Civil War to the Falklands War, and is informed by national and transnational perspectives.

War and society masters

While the lectures are focused initially on Western Europe, evidence is also drawn from non-European societies. This is reflected in the integration of these approaches in the analysis of various topics including the debates on key issues in War and Society that occur at regular intervals in the module. LEARNING OUTCOMES The aim of the more philosophical topics in the module is to provide students with an understanding of: The key challenges to moral thinking about war and how these can be met by the development of a robust framework for the ethical evaluation of war; An appreciation of the role of just war thinking in the critical examination of war and of the importance of the virtues in military life; Through selected case studies, how to analyse and evaluate critically the morality of past, present and prospective military conflicts. Just war thinking, as developed, is then applied to address contemporary security challenges. Our innovative research provides an exciting and stimulating backdrop to our teaching. The aim of the sociological aspect of the module is to describe and explain the main changes in the relationships between warfare, armed forces and society that have occurred since the 'military revolution' in Western Europe during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. To understand how war works, a broad range of methods must be brought into play. We have a thriving postgraduate community of students on the taught Masters programme as well as those specialising on war and conflict in their doctoral research. Contact us Welcome to the Centre for the History of War and Society The Centre for the History of War and Society is concerned with the everyday experience, memory and representation of modern conflicts and periods of mass violence.

We have a thriving postgraduate community of students on the taught Masters programme as well as those specialising on war and conflict in their doctoral research.

It focuses on the links between military organisation and the rise of the modern nation state. Cultural historians might consider war as a subject of epic poetry, triumphant sculpture, or martial music.

The centre is based in the Department of Historybut is interdisciplinary in its vision and practice. The Centre was established in to bring together current faculty, researchers and students who are researching at the cutting edge of the field.

War and society syllabus

While the lectures are focused initially on Western Europe, evidence is also drawn from non-European societies. It focuses on the links between military organisation and the rise of the modern nation state. Our work ranges in time from the American Civil War to the Falklands War, and is informed by national and transnational perspectives. They might also look at popular cultures of war, or at how new forms of communication books, posters, films have often permitted new varieties of propaganda. It builds on a long foundation of teaching and researching the history of war and society since the university was founded in the s. The Centre was established in to bring together current faculty, researchers and students who are researching at the cutting edge of the field. The centre is based in the Department of History , but is interdisciplinary in its vision and practice. To understand how war works, a broad range of methods must be brought into play. Sussex students benefit from extensive archival resources onsite, such as the refugee papers collected by the German-Jewish Centre. Our innovative research provides an exciting and stimulating backdrop to our teaching.

The aim of the philosophical aspects of the module is to explore the challenges to moral thinking about war, particularly those posed by realism and moral scepticism; and to determine how ethical reasoning can help in assessing the morality of war, including the contribution of just war thinking and the role played by the virtues in military life.

They might also look at popular cultures of war, or at how new forms of communication books, posters, films have often permitted new varieties of propaganda.

War and society impact factor

While the lectures are focused initially on Western Europe, evidence is also drawn from non-European societies. To understand how war works, a broad range of methods must be brought into play. They might also look at popular cultures of war, or at how new forms of communication books, posters, films have often permitted new varieties of propaganda. The aim of the sociological aspect of the module is to describe and explain the main changes in the relationships between warfare, armed forces and society that have occurred since the 'military revolution' in Western Europe during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. By looking at political history, we can see how domestic conflicts and constitutional debates have shaped the ways in which wars were fought, and explore the consequences—territorial, political, institutional—of victory and defeat. This is reflected in the integration of these approaches in the analysis of various topics including the debates on key issues in War and Society that occur at regular intervals in the module. Throughout, the importance of multi-disciplinary approaches to the subject is emphasised, not least the relationship between philosophical, historical and sociological perspectives. At undergraduate level, students can study modules throughout their degree programme which consider the direct and indirect effects of war and violence on society in a variety of global, comparative and national contexts. Contact us Welcome to the Centre for the History of War and Society The Centre for the History of War and Society is concerned with the everyday experience, memory and representation of modern conflicts and periods of mass violence. It focuses on the links between military organisation and the rise of the modern nation state. The changing character of war and its implications for how we think about war and society in the twenty-first century. Yale historians study and teach about the causes, nature, and consequences of warfare in all corners of the world, from antiquity to the present. Alternately, they might examine antiwar and resistance movements, or the ways in which ordinary people coped with the horrors of extreme violence. The centre is based in the Department of History , but is interdisciplinary in its vision and practice. Cultural historians might consider war as a subject of epic poetry, triumphant sculpture, or martial music.

For historians of modern Britain in particular, the Mass-Observation Archive and Mass Observation Project represent a unique and unparalleled resource.

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Centre for the History of War and Society : University of Sussex